Why did I play this?Why did I play this?

Posted on Aug 29th 2019 at 08:00:00 AM by (SirPsycho)
Posted under PSP, action, strategy, stealth


The Metal Gear series is one of the most legendary in the entire realm of gaming. Rising from the obscurity of its roots on the mostly Japanese centered MSX computer platform, the reboot of the series with 1998's Metal Gear Solid for the PlayStation cemented the series as one of Konami's flagships. Its unique stealth centered action design gave the gameplay a one of a kind feel that would barely be replicated despite the game and series' runaway success.

Konami would follow the first Metal Gear Solid's success with a mission based spin-off Metal Gear Solid: VR Missions before the main series would continue on PlayStation 2. Both Metal Gear Solid 2 and 3 were some of the most successful games for the PS2. Sony had released a portable console in Japan in 2004, which released in the rest of the world in 2005, the PlayStation Portable. The next Metal Gear game would be Metal Gear Solid: Portable Ops for the PSP in 2006, followed by Metal Gear Solid 4: Guns of the Patriots on the PlayStation 3. Meanwhile, the team that developed Portable Ops was developing the PSP's flagship Metal Gear Solid game, Peace Walker. During the late PS3/XBox 360 generation, Metal Gear Solid V: Ground Zeroes would be released; followed by its second part, The Phantom Pain. For long time fans of the Metal Gear Solid series, Portable Ops and Peace Walker feels like the definitive dividing line between the older PS1 and PS2 era games, and the HD PS3/PS4 and Xbox 360/Xbox One games.


Continue reading Metal Gear Solid: Peace Walker



Posted on Jul 22nd 2019 at 08:00:00 AM by (SirPsycho)
Posted under playstation, platformer, 2d, adventure


In 1996 a legendary game designer left Capcom to form his own game development company. Tokuro Fujiwara founded Whoopee Camp after an insane career as a video game director and producer that spanned over a decade at Capcom. Fujiwara's credits listings while working at Capcom easily rank him amongst the greatest game designers of the 8 and 16 bit arcade and console era. He is credited with creating Ghosts 'n Goblins, directing and producing multiple games including Sweet Home, Breath of Fire, DuckTales and many other Capcom licensed games from the era, Final Fight 2 and Final Fight 3, and multiple Mega Man games. What would be Fujiwara and Whoopee Camp's first game after Fujiwara left this legacy behind and forged his own path?



Continue reading Tomba!



Posted on Jun 26th 2019 at 08:00:00 AM by (SirPsycho)
Posted under Fishing in the Arcade, sega, dreamcast, fishing controller, motion control


When springtime rolls around a wide variety of outdoor activities becomes much more alluring. Getting outside and getting some sun is important to even the most hardcore of gamers. Fishing is a great hobby that can be enjoyed year round, but the comfortable temperatures of spring bring out the biggest crowds. It's such a large and popular hobby that Sega decided to make a fishing arcade game, Sega Bass Fishing.

The original arcade cabinet was developed by Sega AM 1 and released in 1997 as Get Bass in Japan. The game was successful enough in the arcade that Sega followed it up with Sega Marine Fishing in 1999. Both games would see console ports on the Sega Dreamcast, Sega Bass Fishing in 1999 and Sega Marine Fishing in 2000. Both games were among the more popular and successful Dreamcast games, as Sega released the Sega Fishing Controller to make the games feel more similar to both the arcade and real life, complete with motion controls.


Continue reading Sega Bass Fishing



Posted on May 20th 2019 at 08:00:00 AM by (SirPsycho)
Posted under Point and Click, adventure, nintendo ds, dual screen, visual novel


The Nintendo DS was a landmark handheld console. In hindsight Nintendo looks prophetic with its adoption of a touchscreen in the years just before the idea of the smartphone takes hold in the public consciousness. This touchscreen allowed many gameplay ideas that were once slow and clunky to become much smoother. Point and click adventure games are mostly known from the PC market, but there have been some ports and original point and clicks on older consoles and handhelds. The DS with its touchscreen allowed point and click adventure games to be played in the palm of everybody's hand, and there was an explosion of them. One of the early prominent developers of DS point and click adventures was the Japanese developer Cing. In 2005 they released Another Code: Two Memories, which was renamed Trace Memory for North America. In 2007 the company released Hotel Dusk: Room 215, both of these titles did quite well for the small developer. However, Cing was not able to keep this momentum rolling and went defunct in 2010.

Hotel Dusk was the first of a two part series, with its sequel being Last Window: The Secret of Cape West. Both games released on the DS, and Last Window was also Cing's final game before going bankrupt. Nintendo published all these DS titles, but part of Cing's problems may have been the seemingly random release regions of their games. Trace Memory and Hotel Dusk released in Japan, North America, and Europe and achieved some success. Last Window and Trace Memory's sequel, Another Code: R - A Journey into Lost Memories for the Wii, only released in Japan and Europe. Last Window released too late in Cing's life to likely come to North America, they were already dying when the game was releasing. What was strange about Hotel Dusk was that its first release region was in North America. So what made Hotel Dusk so special that many adventure game fans had to have it and play it? What gave it the crossover appeal to give it that little extra push?


Continue reading Hotel Dusk: Room 215



Posted on Apr 24th 2019 at 08:00:00 AM by (SirPsycho)
Posted under Flower Power, rpg, turn based, playstation 3, ps3, gust


In the world of gaming there is a phenomenon known as the annual release. In the Western world the annual release is almost synonymous with the sports genre. In Japan, they have annualized role playing games. Its not as ubiquitous as the wide world of sports but there are a few examples, the Atelier series likely being the most prominent. Atelier is a long running series developed by GUST, the first releases being all the way back on the first Playstation with 1997's Atelier Marie: The Alchemist of Salburg. The series went international starting with the localization of the Atelier Iris trilogy for the Playstation 2. The series was an immediate hit for GUST, who just kept pumping more games in the series out. By the time of the series' 20th anniversary in 2017 there were 19 games released in the series. This is not a direct series with sequels, prequels, spin offs, and side projects. Instead the Atelier series is one that features common gameplay elements and mechanical design. Atelier is more of a series of series, with the large library broken down into duologies and mostly trilogies. Today's game, Atelier Ayesha is the first game in the Dusk trilogy, the 2nd overall trilogy that was fully released on the Playstation 3.


Continue reading Atelier Ayesha: The Alchemist of Dusk



Posted on Mar 28th 2019 at 08:00:00 AM by (SirPsycho)
Posted under Sega, playstation 3, ps3, action, beat em up, rpg


The Yakuza series has been a long running saga starting on the PlayStation 2. It actually started fairly late in the console's lifecycle, and a lack of marketing made the first two games go overlooked by most of the Western gaming public at the time. On the other hand this was one of Sega's biggest hits within Japan since the Saturn, so they mostly focused on the home market. Western interest in the series was recently kicked into overdrive with the release of Yakuza 0 and the remakes of the first two games, and a remaster of this third game has already released in Japan. I had played the first Yakuza a couple years before the release of its modern PlayStation 4 remake, Yakuza Kiwami, so I saw firsthand what the improvements were, and the only downgrade in my opinion was the remixed soundtrack. The first Yakuza game I had ever played was Yakuza 4, which seems to be the first game in the series that received a decent amount of attention from Western audiences, but still a shadow of what Yakuza 0 and the Kiwami remakes have enjoyed.


Continue reading Yakuza 3



Posted on Feb 24th 2019 at 08:00:00 AM by (SirPsycho)
Posted under platforming, playstation, ps1, psone, psx, platformer, 3d


The Playstation and Nintendo 64 rarely had games that competed directly. Nintendo has long been going their own way, and that was no different than during this generation. One area where the two consoles did compete was in the realm of 3D platformers. The debate about which console has the best 3D platformers of this era still flares up from time to time, in a way similar to the much more fun 16-bit war between Sega and Nintendo.


Continue reading Spyro the Dragon



Posted on Jan 29th 2019 at 08:00:00 AM by (SirPsycho)
Posted under face punch, pc, rpg, open world, 3d


Gothic is an action role playing game developed by Piranha Bytes, a German company. The game released in 2001 to most of the Western world, with a variety of different publishers getting the game on shelves in different regions. Egmont Interactive published the game for the German market, THQ was the publisher for the larger European market, while Xicat Interactive was the North American publisher.

The late 1990s and early 2000s saw a rise of 3D open world RPGs, these varied in quality as there were no standards for design at this point, making each game quite unique. What makes Gothic stand out the most is its setting and world design. The prison colony guarded by a magic barrier was a world design decision meant to make the game world's dimensions feel a bit more realistic. Instead of being an entire world like Ultima IX, or a large, expansive landmass like Morrowind, Gothic's developers realized that the actual size of a handbuilt map would be much smaller than an entire world would feel. In this way the magic barrier serves two purposes, make the world feel much larger than it is presented in game, and also give the player a narrative incentive to beat the game.


Continue reading Gothic



Posted on Dec 28th 2018 at 08:00:00 AM by (SirPsycho)
Posted under Samurai Cowgirl, playstation 2, ps2, wii, rpg, visual novel


Sakura Wars is a long running series of tactical role playing games that was created by Red Entertainment, who has shared most development credit with Sega. Its first release was in 1996 on Sega's Saturn, however this series would remain in Japan. Sega would release four games on its own consoles, two each on the Saturn and Dreamcast. Its fifth entry would release on Sony's PlayStation 2 in 2005, long after Sega finally called it quits on their own hardware. This would be the first game in the series to release outside of Japan, with its original PS2 release localized by NIS America for North America in 2010. The game's later Wii port would be released in North America and Europe at the same time as the PS2 localization. Its design history and mixed reception seemed to have lead Red and Sega to both give up on the series, until a recent announcement of a game called Shin Sakura Taisen in 2018, or New Sakura Wars in English.


Continue reading Sakura Wars: So Long My Love



Posted on Nov 28th 2018 at 08:00:00 AM by (SirPsycho)
Posted under Squaresoft, playstation, shooter, shmup, scrolling shooter


In 1997, Squaresoft was starting to toy around with developing games that were not role playing games. For the first time since the 8-bit era, they were looking to expand their portfolio beyond a single genre. They had published and released two vastly different fighting games in 1997, Tobal No. 1 and Bushido Blade. Outside of fighting games, Square had created a subsidiary called Aques (only missing an 'R' to be an anagram of Square), who primarily published sports and mahjong games. Most of these forays were in the realm of publishing, but internally Square was developing their own game that broke their traditional RPG mold. A team was using the technology Square had bought and developed for Final Fantasy VII to create a 2D arcade style scrolling shooter with 3D elements. Final Fantasy VII was released in Japan in January 1997, while a shooter called Einhander, released in November. Einhander was released in North America in 1998. The title of the game is German and translates to English as 'one-handed sword.' Despite the German influence, the game never saw a European release.


Continue reading Einhander



Posted on Oct 29th 2018 at 08:00:00 AM by (SirPsycho)
Posted under RPG, horror, pc, vampires, halloween


The World of Darkness is a trio of settings for supernatural and horror tabletop role playing games. It was originally developed as the background setting for the original 1991 release of Vampire: The Masquerade. The series gained some popularity in tabletop circles as an alternative to a rather scant selection between an adaptation of H. P. Lovecraft's Call of Cthulhu and the Ravenloft setting of Dungeons and Dragons. While Ravenloft is medieval and Call of Cthulhu is set in the 1920's, the World of Darkness is mostly our own modern world with plenty of supernatural details added into the recipe, with some spinoffs set in various historical eras.

Vampire: The Masquerade is the most popular game set in the World of Darkness, but some other popular releases include Hunter: The Reckoning, Mage: The Ascension, and Werewolf: The Apocalypse. The naming convention becomes easy to identify quite quickly. Multiple video games have been released in the World of Darkness, including three focused on Vampire: The Masquerade. The first one was an action RPG developed by Nihilistic Software and released in 2000 called Vampire: The Masquerade - Redemption. This game was a modest success, enough to greenlight a sequel. Troika Games developed this sequel, called Bloodlines, with Activision publishing both Redemption and Bloodlines, both exclusive to PC.


Continue reading Spooky Plays: Vampire: The Masquerade: Bloodlines



Posted on Sep 27th 2018 at 08:00:00 AM by (SirPsycho)
Posted under Capcom, xbox 360, xbox, ps4, playstation 4, xbox one, steam, pc, survival horror, sandbox


In 2005, Capcom released Dead Rising for the Xbox 360. Capcom made their entry into the world of High Definition gaming a memorable one, as Dead Rising was like no other game before it. There were a few years around and following the release of Dead Rising where zombies would rule the roost, as games from both large developers like Capcom themselves, Valve, and Activision, had games or popular game modes that had a heavy emphasis on zombies. This popularity also coincided with the rise of indie games on the PC market, and zombie games thrived there for a few years until fatigue inevitably set in. Most of the biggest zombie games and modes were first person shooters, whether it was Nazi Zombies from Treyarch's Call of Duty games, Left 4 Dead, or Killing Floor, running around and shooting zombies made quite a bit of sense.

Capcom is not known for first person shooters, and instead designed Dead Rising in a completely different manner based around what it did know and had recently experimented with. Dead Rising has a third person perspective where combat is more focused around melee weapons. Guns do exist, but they are clumsy to aim and not particularly powerful until the player has completed one of the most difficult challenges in the game, which unlocks the most powerful gun, and overall weapon, in Dead Rising.


Continue reading Spooky Plays: Dead Rising



Posted on Aug 26th 2018 at 08:00:00 AM by (SirPsycho)
Posted under action rpg, playstation, ps4, xbox, xbox one, pc, rpg


2B holding 9S with a 3rd character you don't need to know about yet.

The year is 2003. The PlayStation 2 is lighting up sales charts the likes of which no console had ever seen before. It was now a few years into the console's lifecycle, so games were starting to really flood the market. Square Enix released a game called Drakengard, the first game directed by a now well known eccentric, Yoko Taro. One of the design elements of the game included multiple endings, one of which seems rather nonsensical at first. (The following will include heavy spoilers to one of Drakengard's endings, and the reason for this detailed description will follow soon after.)


Continue reading NieR: Automata



Posted on Jun 27th 2018 at 08:00:00 AM by (SirPsycho)
Posted under western jrpg, rpg, pc, science fiction, sci fi, turn based


Ion Storm was an interesting company. Its active presence on the market was relatively short, being founded in late 1996 and going belly up in early 2005. For being around nearly a decade there are only two games that most people think of when they hear the company's name. The overhyped and woefully underwhelming Daikatana from Ion Storm Dallas, including one of the most legendary and tasteless advertisements any game has ever had. On the flip side Ion Storm Austin produced the critically acclaimed instant classic Deus Ex. The company later produced a sequel to Deus Ex in 2003 and the third game in the Thief series in 2004, months before closure. Sandwiched between all of these was a game called Anachronox, releasing in 2001.


Continue reading Anachronox



Posted on May 26th 2018 at 08:00:00 AM by (SirPsycho)
Posted under old hat, media, controversy


This snapshot was taken on 24/05/2018

For years I have found myself moving away from the mainstream gaming press, and even reaching the point of outright ignoring it. I could not mention the last time I went to any of the mainstream gaming press sites just to browse and see what news is coming out. The only time I end up there is seemingly by accident, browsing a forum, board, or group dedicated to an individual game or series that then links to a news release pertaining to the topic. Upon reflection of my own browsing habits and years of history I found that this relative ignorance of what the mainstream gaming press is actually saying pre-dates plenty of the recent major controversies. I was already years deep into this willful ignorance when Gamer Gate started to blow up. The exact reasons I started these habits are long forgotten, but with some time passing and new developments of the day, as well as the effect it had on everybody's browsing habits, then there might be more reasons than ever to justify the abandonment of the mainstream critic.


Continue reading The Gaming Press Is Obsolete


                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               
This is SirPsycho's Blog.
View Profile | RSS
A collection of memories and philosophies based on my own best and worst gaming experiences.
Blog Navigation
Browse Bloggers | My Blog
Hot Entries
Hot Community Entries
Site content Copyright © rfgeneration.com unless otherwise noted. Oh, and keep it on channel three.