RF Generation.  The Classic and Modern Gaming Databases.RF Generation.  The Classic and Modern Gaming Databases.

Posted on May 18th 2016 at 08:00:00 AM by (bombatomba)
Posted under arcade port, console, NES, Nintendo, I do not care what anyone says Double Dragon is better on the NES


Original image from modthesims2.com

Once upon a time, the most desired trait of any home console gamer was to play arcade ports.  In this fashion, one could say that arcades ruled the jungles of electronic video game entertainment.  While complete faithfulness to the arcade original was the holy grail, it was certainly not a requirement, though individual interpretation on the quality of the port was certainly in place, especially in the playgrounds and hallways of schools.

Once upon a time, I was among those that desired the "perfect" arcade port, having been a child in the jungle of electronic entertainment.  Yet, as I grew in years, complete faithfulness to the arcade original was only a concern, then less of a concern, then finally of little to no concern.  Don't get me wrong, I still love original arcade games, it just so happens that in my mind, certain games have been usurped by certain console ports, so that when someone says, "Remember how awesome xxxxxx game was back in the day?" and I say, "Yes," my mind isn't even remotely in the vicinity of the arcade original.  Curiosity piqued yet?


Continue reading But I Like Those Ports!



Posted on Apr 22nd 2016 at 08:00:00 AM by (bombatomba)
Posted under Kings Knight, Square, early Square game, NES, Gold and Blue



I will be the first to admit I was a stupid kid.  Between 1990-92 I made a series of shameful visits to the Toys R Us "budget wall" section, where NES games could be had for a pittance.  Or $20, which I guess wasn't a pittance.  Some of you may remember an earlier article where I detailed the psychological damage caused by purchasing and playing Hydlide in 1991.  Would you believe that I had been burned before that piece of horror, not only from a game on the same wall, but in the same way, while looking for an inexpensive version of another game.  With Hydlide I was trolling for a RPG experience.  This time - the first time -  I was looking for something with some action and adventure in it (an action/adventure game, if you will).  But I guess there is no point in delaying, as you have already read the title of the article as well as seen the picture above.  Ladies and gentlemen, I bring you a tale of disappointment and discovery; Budget Wall Chronicles - King's Knight.


Continue reading Budget Wall Chronicles - King's Knight



Posted on Dec 16th 2014 at 12:00:00 AM by (singlebanana)
Posted under playthrough, 50 Cent, Kid Icarus, NES, XBox, 360, Blood on the Sand, PS3, January 2015


So your 2015 New Year's resolution is to join in and play more of the community playthrough titles, eh?  Well start off January with a bang and hook up with the RF Generation Playthrough Group as they ring in the New Year with a NES cult classic and a lesser known, but fantastic, shoot 'em up, adventure title.


Continue reading January 2015 Community Playthrough



Posted on Aug 2nd 2014 at 12:00:00 AM by (Crabmaster2000)
Posted under Overlord, unloved, nes, nintendo, rts, strategy, scifi




Continue reading Unloved #28 - Overlord



Posted on Jul 6th 2012 at 04:02:50 AM by (Crabmaster2000)
Posted under Volleyball, Nintendo, NES, Vball, Spike, Super Spike Vball, Kings of the Beach, Volley ball

It may not be the most popular sport around, but Volleyball was well known enough in the NES era to warrant 3 licensed titles on the system. Luckily each of these titles offers a drastically different take on the sport. Each game shines and stumbles in its own distinct areas.





Curious to know which of them are worth your time? I was, but no longer.



Continue reading Crabmaster's Guide to NES Volleyball



Posted on May 18th 2012 at 08:42:58 AM by (Crabmaster2000)
Posted under Super Mario Bros, Super Mario Bros 2, Super Mario Bros 3, NES, Nintendo

Most gamers that have been around for any amount of time have experienced Super Mario Bros in some fashion. I'm no exception and grew up with Super Mario Bros, Super Mario Bros 2 and Super Mario Bros 3 as staples in my gaming education. All three are regularly named for their high quality, impact on the industry and most importantly for being fun.



Over the years my gaming tastes have waxed and waned, constantly evolving as I experience (or re-experience) more titles, reflect on past adventures and struggle to overlook my nostalgic feelings. The Mario brothers are often at the fore front of such conflict. With all three of these games being so important to my gaming career (I like to pretend I get paid) did one stand above the others? If so, which one?



Continue reading Whats Your Mario?



Posted on Apr 9th 2011 at 11:25:50 AM by (Crabmaster2000)
Posted under Shatterhand, Unloved, NES, Punching Action, Robots,





Continue reading Unloved #24: Shatterhand



Posted on Jan 23rd 2011 at 02:35:21 PM by (Crabmaster2000)
Posted under Recca, NES, Famicom, Competition, Shooter, Shmup, Fast, Crazy, Hardcore





Continue reading Unloved #?: Summer Carnival 92' Recca



Posted on Nov 24th 2010 at 01:58:31 PM by (Crabmaster2000)
Posted under Metal Storm, Unloved, NES, Platformer, Reverse Platformer, Robots!, Space Battles





Heading back to the trusty ole' NES again for this one!

Would it surprise you if I said this game for the NES was a platformer/shooter with a space theme? No you say. It does seem to be a common style of game on the system (see previous Blogs such as Xexyz or Journey to Silius). I assume that why this title often gets overlooked.



What people are missing out on by not playing this game is something pretty neat though. Wait for it................................upside down platforming. It might sound a little hokey at first, but its actually a ton of fun. At any time during the game you can switch from a gravity obeying mech warrior to an upside down robot with a gun.

Each stage has some form of rooftop so that you can always bounce back and forth as desired. Sometimes this is to collect powerups, other times for tactical strategy and others yet for the sheer enjoyment of it.



Most of the levels are designed pretty straightforward, but stages 4 and 6 really stand out to me. In level 4 you play the whole area, including boss, trapped in a box. The box moves around the screen at (mostly) stationary enemies. Some you can kill and some you cannot. This makes for some very interesting platforming even though your stuck in a box.

Level 6 gets even better yet. The level scrolls downward constantly while you trek to the right of the screen. I have a hard time describing how cool it is so I found  a video to help me out.

To get to the stage 6 part just skip ahead to about 2:30:



Metal Storm probably gets lumped in with a lot of other games because of the style and theme which I think is unfair. It actually translates the Sci-Fi setting into a really cool and playable game play mechanic. Definitely check it out if you havenít yet. It can be a little harder to track down than some other NES games, but if you can find it for under $15 you've got yourself a solid deal.



Posted on Oct 19th 2010 at 03:30:00 AM by (dsheinem)
Posted under Launch Games, Launch Game, NES, Super Mario Bros., R.O.B.

Twenty Five years ago today, the Nintendo Entertainment System launched in the United States.  Before its run was over with the release of Wario's Woods in 1994, the system became the bestselling video game console of all time (a mark that would not be passed for many years), the company's name literally became synonymous with gaming, and the NES' library had achieved a special place in the hearts and minds of gamers the world over.  Even today, the system is usually recognized as the most popular of all retro consoles, and many gamers continue to collect games in cartridge format or play them via the Wii's Virtual Console or emulation. 


That success was far from guaranteed when the system launched in the U.S. on October 18, 1985.  In fact, many onlookers felt dubious about the chances for Nintendo's console to succeed in the post-crash market of the mid-1980s.  And even though the system had been moderately successful in the two years since it had launched in Japan (as the Family Computer), the kind of reception it would receive amongst American audiences was widely unknown.  For this reason, the U.S. release was a limited one.  The October 1985 date was for the New York City test market, and the full nationwide launch wouldn't be until February of 1986 after Nintendo saw some success in New York (and a few other markets).

Long before Metroid, Mega Man, Castlevania, Final Fantasy, or Contra became household names, Nintendo launched a product in the U.S. that had to convince a skeptical audience that it was worth investing in a new console.  What was it like to purchase a brand new Nintendo Entertainment Center in October of '85 (or February of 1986)?  What was the system launch like? Did those early decisions help the system achieve later greatness? Read on!

Part 1: The Games

The launch lineup consisted of eighteen games!  This was almost twice the amount of games that launched in the U.S. with the Atari VCS, and half again as many games as had launched with the Colecovision.  In some ways, this was a curious decision.  While it afforded gamers a high degree of choice, it also served as a reminder that chief catalyst for the gaming crash a few years earlier had been a market flooded with low-quality games.  Fortunately for Nintendo, their launch titles were not low quality.  But, standing in a store 25 years ago, it might be hard for a gamer not to think that they were seeing more of the same practice that had killed enthusiasm and sales for Atari a short time ago.


The launch lineup took cues from Atari. As we've covered previously, the Atari VCS launch featured games with very short, descriptive titles (Combat, Blackjack, Street Racer, etc.).  This let consumers know what they were buying, whereas a game named after a character might not.  For the most part, Nintendo followed suit.  Roughly half of the launch games featured titles which made gameplay elements explicitly obvious (10 Yard Fight, Baseball, Duck Hunt, Golf, Kung Fu, Pinball, Soccer, and Tennis) and another set made it easy to guess what the game featured (Excitebike, Ice Climber, Stack-Up, and Wild Gunman).  Unlike Atari, however, Nintendo did include a few of their well known IPs in the launch lineup: Mario (Super Mario Bros.) and Donkey Kong (Donkey Kong Jr. Math) both made the cut, only leaving gamers scratching their head over titles like Clu Clu Land, Hogans Alley, Gyromite, and Wrecking Crew.  In any case, like Atari, Nintendo offered a wide variety of launch titles, the scope of which wouldn't be offered again until Sony's PS2 launch almost 15 years later.


The launch lineup featured the system's iconic game (and character).  The NES launch has several solid titles, but none were as important as Super Mario Bros.  Mario was already a well known character based on the success of the Mario Bros. games and Mario's link to Donkey Kong, but Miyamoto's side-scrolling masterpiece was the game to define the console from day 1.  Some of the launch bundles included the game, and it would go on to become the best-selling game of all time (a mark not passed until Wii Sports recently took the crown) .  Few launch lineups in history have featured a game that made it into the all-time top 10, and all of them are games that launched with Nintendo systems.

Quality assured.  In another nod to the video game crash, Nintendo included the Nintendo Seal of Quality on its titles to (hopefully) let consumers know that the games they were buying were bug-free, high quality titles.  The seal may not have meant much in 1985, but by the time the NES was in homes across the country a few years later the seal came to represent an important departure from the flooded market that came to symbolize the latter days of the 2600's run.


(Note: I plan to cover many of these games in the blog individually in the future, but in the meantime there is an excellent run-down of the basics of each launch game here:  http://matwolf.com/blog/n...-original-18-nes-games-2/  I shamelessly stole their images of box art, too.)

Part 2: The System

The D-Pad.  Nintendo was not technically the first console maker or video game company to include a standard D-Pad, but they certainly popularized it.  Nintendo's games were designed with the D-pad in mind, and anyone who has tried playing a Super Mario Bros. or Zelda game with an arcade stick knows that the experience is lacking.  The D-Pad also signaled that the console would be more than a platform for arcade ports (which used joysticks), but that plenty of new content produced specifically for the console and its controller would be coming.


The graphics and sound. It is easy to forget that the NES once was a powerhouse system, as today when most of us look back on the 8-bit days we think about the simplicity of the visuals and sounds.  Put simply, even Nintendo's launch games blew away anything that had been seen on a console up to that point, and rivaled some of the best computer graphics and sound of the era.  Seamless scrolling, character RAM, 20+ colors, dedicated audio, and region-specific refresh rates all meant that the NES was a system that had both innovated and capitalized on the best of what was available in mid-1980s hardware.  And while the launch lineup was impressive, the games in the system's later years would demonstrate just how impressive the processors inside the NES were.


Part 3: The Launch

The bundles were a good deal, but the games were pricey.  If you bought a new NES in late '85 or early '86, you most certainly wanted to buy a system bundle and probably didn't end up buying very many games off the bat.  I haven't yet found reliable data, but some web searching suggests that in 1985/1986 NES games were priced between $40-$70 MSRP depending on where you lived.  When their launch went nationwide, Nintendo sold two bundles for consumers interested in buying the system. The Control Deck bundle with 2 controllers, a zapper and Super Mario Bros. retailed for $130 and the Deluxe Set, which included R.O.B., a zapper, two controllers, Gyromite and Duck Hunt sold for $250.  Adjusted for today's inflation, games cost around $100, the control deck cost about $250, and the Deluxe Set cost just shy of $500.  This means that consumers in 1985 were getting the system and accessories for roughly $150 in today's money, and that R.O.B. could be valued at about $150 himself.  That might seem high, until one realizes that robots were all the rage in 1985...


Robotic Operating Buddy. A Japanese newspaper in  July of 1985 announced the upcoming U.S. release of the NES in an article entitled "Nintendo to sell video game player-robot combination in U.S." In the article, they discuss the strategy behind R.O.B.

Quote
Nintendo displayed the Family Computer this year at consumer electronics shows in Las Vegas and Chicago, and has carried out market research. The home video game boom in the U.S., dominated by Atari and Commodore International, peaked out three years ago, and since then the market has contracted with much underselling.

For this reason, the Family Computer, with its attached robot, is to be billed as a different concept from the conventional video game. The robot is run by a cartridge inserted into the computer, and both it and the video screen can be operated simultaneously. The robot measures 22.8 by 18 by 23.5 centimeters.

The robot contains three battery-powered motors which control such operations as picking objects up and putting them down, raising and lowering, and turning around and carrying objects. Commands are sent by a flashing signal from the monitor screen, which is picked up by a light sensor in the robot.

In Japan, the robot sells at a low Y9,800, with two types of cartridges prices at Y4,800 and Y5,800 respectively. In the U.S., the player, robot and cartridge will be sold as a unit for around $100.

From early on, the emphasis was on the robot, as evidenced again by a Guardian article from October of 1985 that mentions Nintendo's console as R.O.B.-centric:

Quote
Toy makers in Britain and North America have been predicting since January that 1985 would be the year of the robot. Or at least of the toy robot.

Nintendo - has its eyes on the toy robot market. Primarily a computer and video games company, it has invented an interactive robot to play some of their video games.

Using a light link to the television, the 10in tall robot adds a new dimension to the video game. Prompted by invisible sensory devices which read messages from the TV screen, the robot performs a variety of spontaneous interactive affect game play. Standing on its stationary 6in base, the robot can assume 60 different lifelike positions by rotating its arms and shoulders left or right, and up or down, and can lift and move objects. It can pick up screen messages from as far away as 15ft, adding tremendous challenge to play strategy.

Nintendo plans to offer four robot games packs with the initial introduction of the system, and up to four additional games will be developed by the end of the year. The robot costs pounds 100 and the games about pounds 15.

Again, today we often think of R.O.B. as an interesting afterthought or as a failed, largely gimmicky accessory for the NES.  But in 1985, most of the press surrounding the launch of the NES focused not on its games, but on this accessory.  This was by Nintendo's design, and suggested from the moment of their first U.S. console release that they were trying to attract interest from a broader population of consumers instead of just gamers.  They would of course repeat this strategy with their most successful console, the Wii.

It was not marketed as a gaming system.Due in large part to the gaming crash of a few years prior, Nintendo marketed the console as a device that allowed for learning and other forms of entertainment beyond simply playing video games.  Their ads focused not on the graphics, the game library, or the features often touted when a new console releases  -- they focused instead on the interactive nature of accessories like R.O.B. and the Zapper.  The first NES commercial in the U.S. is an example of this:


Another example is the 1986 Sears Wishlist catalog, which emphasizes that the NES was a

Quote
fully equipped video system with the most progressive components such as a robot and the light-sensing Zapper Light Gunplus...it's not just for kids.


The art.  As is the case with any new product, good art is important to help sell the attractiveness of the item to the consumer.  Nintendo's emphasis in two areas - the game box design and the system box artwork - most certainly helped move units. The game box design (as seen above) emphasized the graphics of the games .  A drastic departure from the Atari VCS or Colecovision game boxes before it, the NES game boxes showed blown up approximations o f the sprite art that players would find in the game.  Even if the graphics weren't emphasized in marketing, they were certainly emphasized on store shelves.  The art for the systems themselves featured a dark blue/black with stars background.  The control deck set featured the system and hardware floating in space, while the Deluxe set emphasized R.O.B.'s head.  At a time when there was still enthusiasm about the space program, sci-fi was seeing a renaissance in theaters, and robots were all the rage, the art reflected the broader interests of consumers.


In retrospect, much about the NES launch seems strange today.  Most launches haven't followed the same cues (e.g. test markets and a downplayed emphasis on games/graphics), the system itself is no longer known for many of the things that Nintendo chose to highlight at launch, several launch games are still regarded as among the best on the system, and one launch title continued to be the best selling game for the console throughout the system's life.  Nintendo took a huge gamble with the release of the NES, and though their strategy seems a bit unorthodox today, it certainly paid off for them twenty five years ago.

Do you remember anything about the NES launch?  Were you in a test market?  What do you think of their strategy?  I'd love to hear your stories and thoughts, so sound off below!




Posted on Sep 29th 2010 at 11:58:44 AM by (Crabmaster2000)
Posted under Fire N Ice, Unloved, Review, Puzzle, NES, Tecmo





Continue reading Unloved #18: Fire N Ice



Posted on Sep 12th 2010 at 12:57:31 PM by (Crabmaster2000)
Posted under Journey to Silus, NES, Platform, Action, Sci Fi, Terminator, Unloved, Sweet Tunes





Continue reading Unloved #17: Journey to Silius



Posted on Dec 15th 2008 at 07:06:02 PM by (NES_Rules)
Posted under Review, NES, Famicom, Classic Gaming, Random Review

Reviewing is something completely new to me, so this will be a learning process for me, so feel free to critique my reviewing style. My reviews are based on what I like and dislike about the games, not what I think the general public will like or dislike about the game. Since I'm not a big gamer as most other reviewers, my reviews will be based on the first few levels of games instead of the entire game, so keep that in mind when reading. I'm going to try and start reviewing games that are a little less talked about and maybe even games that you've never heard of.  I'm going to start with some NES and Famicom games because I've got this really cool 76-in-1 pirate cart that is full of great (and not so great) NES and Famicom games.

B-Wings


The first game I'm going to review is B-Wings for the Nintendo Famicom. B-Wings was released in 1986 and is a Japan only game, so good luck finding it if you're in the US or Europe, there isn't even a copy of it on eBay right now, but there was one on GameGavel not too long ago, so they are out there, it just may be a bit pricey.

Gameplay: The game plays about the same as any generic vertical shooter, but it does have one thing that sets it apart from others that I have played. At the start of the game, you have your choice of weapons. There are ten different weapons for you to choose from. The cannon fires three shots that shoot straight in front of you, they are quite powerful, but lack any ability to shoot in other directions. "Wide" fires 5 shots that progressively spread further from each other, they are powerful and the path of destruction is great. "Multi" fires three shots, sometimes they all go straight ahead, other times one goes straight, one goes to the left and one goes to the right, and other times they fire at an angle so they all go forward, but progressively get further form each other.  "Van" fires six very powerful shots that go a very short distance, but spread around you in a fan shape. "Side" fires seven shots, one that goes straight ahead, and three on each side that fire to the sides in a fan shape. "Anti" fires two shots straight ahead and two shots straight behind. "Hammer" is my personal favorite weapon and fires two very powerful shots straight ahead and also has two "orbs" that circle your ship for extra protection. "Jump" is essentially the same as Cannon, but one of the shots explodes, but it doesn't really seem to help things much. "Dyna" is an extremely power single shot that is very wide and can destroy several smaller enemies in the one shot. "Fire" is the last weapon option and is a wave of energy that is quite powerful but has a small range, and it allows you to almost continuously fire.

Once you have selected your weapon, your ship attaches to it and you're sent into space to destroy anything that comes at you. There are several different types of flying enemies to destroy as well as stationary objects to destroy. If an enemy drives into you or hits you with a weapon, you lose your main weapon and have to rely on a very small, weak cannon. If you drive into one of the stationary objects, your ship explodes and you're dead.

Throughout the game, you have the option to pick up another weapon, you can pick it up by simply driving into it if you have already lost your main weapon or you drop your current weapon and then pick up the new one. The weapons all have a different shape, but with 8-bit graphics, it's quite hard trying to distinguish and memorize what each weapon looks like.

There is also the option for 2 players, which sadly isn't co-op, but you alternate turns when one person dies the other picks up where that person dies. It's better than no second player support, but co-op would have been even better.

Graphics & Sound:
The graphics aren't bad for 1986, but nothing spectacular either. I've only played through the first two levels, but the enemies all seem to be unique, so it's not as repetitive as some games in this genre are.

The sound effects and music are very nice. The sound effects are basically your average 8-bit sound effects, but the music is great. Though it is hard to hear when you're constantly blasting away.


In conclusion, this game is great, if you like vertical shooters at least. I could definitely see myself playing this game for hours on end if I had the time. If you're looking for a deep game to lose yourself in the story, well, this isn't for you then. It's more of a pick up play when you've got some spare time type game.
I gave this game a 90% because it is a blast to play, but there really isn't anything memorable about it.





Posted on Sep 27th 2008 at 03:51:07 PM by (Nik the Russian)
Posted under History, Castlevania, NES

September 26, 1986 (22 years ago): Akumajo Dracula is released in Japan.

Alternative names: Castlevania, Demon Castle Dracula.

Consoles: Initially Famicom Disc System and MSX2 in Japan, later NES and others.

Heavily influencing the platformer genre in the late 80's, this vampire-themed game is one of Konami's most famous series. The original game is about some Simon Belmont, who disliked vampires for whatever reason, and particularly wanted to destroy Dracula (every vampire hunter's dream). Using his whip along with other awesome weapons (including a Bible and a flying cross), Simon battled through hordes of Dracula's minions in a demonic castle (hence the title), occasionally stumbling upon an angry horror movie cliche as a boss fight.

Throughout the sequels, gameplay underwent significant changes. RPG-type features were introduced in Castlevania II: Simon's Quest, and removed in Castlevania III: Dracula's Curse. The RPG elements were brought back about ten years later, although in a different form, for one of the most popular titles in the series, Castlevania: Symphony of the Night. A surprise PlayStation hit during the era of 3D games, two-dimensional Symphony featured a completely reworked art style (influenced by Gothic and Baroque styles) and complete exploration freedom.

The franchise went on to make at least 24 (!) video games, with a couple more to be released soon. A motion picture based on the games was also promised, but after 3 years of planning, multiple script revisions, and a writers' strike, this possibility is somewhat dim.



Posted on Sep 26th 2008 at 07:48:18 AM by (NESman93)
Posted under NES, Ice Hockey, Nintendo, Review, sports

  Well, any classic Nintendo NES fan will know that, like other consoles, the NES has its own number of sports games, such as Slalom, and 10 - Yard Fight by Nintendo. There are even games from third parties such as Tecmo's Tecmo Bowl and Super Bowl. One in particular, Ice Hockey, is the one that I will be reviewing here. Starting off, you will notice the cartridge and box art are different than most Nintendo sports titles. Most come in the black boxes that we've all seen at one time or another. Strangely, Ice Hockey comes in a bright blue box with a picture of some random ice hockey player. This is the only Nintendo sports title that hasn't had the cartoony style characters on the box and cart.

  Now, as you first boot up the game, you are treated to some quite cheerful music and some small hockey players on the screen. Like most NES games, Ice Hockey has the option of either 1 or 2 players. As you press start on the controller, you get a screen of several options. On this screen, you get to choose your team (USA, Canada, Russia, Czechoslovakia, Sweden, and Poland), your opponent's team, the speed of the game, and the length of the game, ranging from 7, 10, and 15 minutes. The last thing that you will set up before the game begins, is the setup of your team. You choose which type of players will be on your team. Once all of the options are selected, the match can begin.

  As the game begins, you will start out at center ice to battle for the puck. The gameplay mostly relies on being able to pass the puck, shoot, and how you selected your team. From the get-go, none of the teams have a statistical advantage over the others. Before the game, each team has five players (a stocky player, 2 average players, and a skinny player). The stocky players are the best at shooting and bowling over other players (which is pretty entertaining), the average players are average all around, and finally, the skinny ones are the fastest but tend to be the ones that get bowled over the most often. Also, each team has a goaltender as well. The controller only controls the player that is selected, but it will also control the goaltender no matter which one is selected. Fights can also ensue, and will continue until the ref stops it and sends the starter to the penalty box. Goals can be kind of hard to achieve at times, but when you do score one, it is damn satisfying! One other thing to note is that, when the game is paused, the pause sound is the same pause sound from Super Mario Bros.!

  As you can see, this is one of the greatest sports titles to be released on the NES, and is personally one of my favorite nes games of all time. I'll give this game a 9/10


                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               
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